Oct
04

Can I make a fossil?

Filed Under (General News) by on 04-10-2017 and tagged , ,

I don’t know how but I really like them! Can you help? I have a shell I’d like to ‘fossilise’ I heard Mrs Whiteway telling everyone that her class knows how to make one.

Can you write instructions on the blog to help me and Spike.

 

 



43 Responses to “Can I make a fossil?”

  1.   Owais & Junayd Says:

    Instruction
    tin foil
    plaster of Paris
    a bowl
    water
    air dry clay
    shell or a bone

    method
    1. First you have to put the tin foil on the bowl.
    2. Next you have to mix the water with plaster of Paris and put it in the bowl and wait a night.
    3. Then you have to take your shell out.
    4. after you have to put clay in your bowl and wait 3 days.

    Reply

  2.   Tvisha & Antonina Says:

    You will need
    a bowl
    tin foil
    plaster of paris
    air dry clay
    hot water
    spoon
    seashell
    Method
    1.First wrap the bowl with tin foil.
    2.Then put the plaster of paris in the bowl and put the water in the plaster of paris.
    3.After that, stir it in.
    4.When you done that put the object in the bowl and push it gently.
    5.Next leave it to dry by overnight.
    6.When it dried take out you’re object carefully.
    7.Later on, put the air dry clay and squish it with your thumbs carefully.
    8.Leave it to dry for three days.
    WARNING!
    Do not put your fingers in the plaster of paris if you do this you will burn your skin off.

    Reply

    •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

      These instructions are very clear! I especially appreciate the warning about the plaster. Safety is important in science! Plaster certainly does get warmer than what you would expect. I know from working with fossil mammoths and bison from Oregon. Here is a trick question: How many “fossils” do you have after using this method? Which modes of preservation do they represent (you may not have gone over this in class yet)?

      Reply

  3.   Pasang&abubakar Says:

    YOU will need
    :boll
    :tinfoil
    :objects
    :air-dry clay
    :plaster of paris
    :you will need a bone,see shell,or a plastice animal

    1.get a tin foil then put your tinfoil on the boll and cover it all up.

    2.when you fnished covering the boll then put the plaster of paris then take your object and put it in gently then then leave it for one our.

    3.when you done that take your object back and then take your air-dry clay then roll it and squish it and put it in the boll gently then use you fingers to make it softer then leave it for 3 days when 3 days is finshed take your air-dry clay then there you go your own fossil.

    Reply

  4.   Zofia & Mrs Hester Says:

    No. They take millions of years to form.

    Reply

    •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

      It is very true that paleontologists have a cut-off year for something to be considered a fossil. A true fossil is any evidence of life that is at least 10,000 years old. But making replicas is important. Why might this be? Also, why might we try to model how some fossils are made?

      Reply

  5.   Sefrat & Samir Says:

    How to make a fossil
    you will need:a plaster of Paris,water,plastic toy or shell,bowl,tin foil and air dry clay.

    1 First cover the bowl with tin foil.
    2 Second put the plaster of Paris with water.
    3 Third put the plastic toy or shell in.
    4 next let it dry.
    5 then take out the item.
    6 after get the clay and put it were the item used to be
    7 after that remove the clay
    8 finally your done.

    Reply

    •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

      Fantastic! Did you know there is a field in paleontology that looks at how fossils are preserved? It’s called taphonomy. Why might a paleontologist be interested in taphonomy?

      Reply

      •   20samir Says:

        thank you for coming to the blog how do they make fossil I don”t now cane you tell me?

        Reply

        •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

          Sure! As paleontologists we use fossils to make educated inferences about the past. But the record is incomplete. Sadly, we will never know every species that existed. Soft bodied organisms do not preserve well under most conditions. By understanding those conditions though, we might be able to guess where that animal lived based on what we see today as well. Sometimes only certain parts of an organism are found. Maybe it only a leaf and no sticks or maybe only one half of a clam. We are interested in knowing what chemical, physical and biological forces such as acidity, currents or musculature respectively might have made those things to become fossils and preserve in that way. Because not everything becomes a fossil, we are interested in knowing what those things might be and how that impacts our understanding of the world. There are few jellyfish and worm fossils but they have been on this planet for a long time! Finally, fossils can be altered and we might not be able to distinguish a deformity from an already known species unless we study it.

          Reply

    •   Sefrat Says:

      thanks Mackenzie smith;].

      Reply

  6.   sammad&carla Says:

    you will need
    . 2 bowls
    .tin foil
    .plaster of parisp
    .air dry clay
    .shell a dinosuor or a bone
    method
    1.first you will need to put the plaster of paris in the bowl.
    2.next put the object in the plaster of paris.
    3.leave it to dry overnight
    4.the next morning get the object out.
    5.then put some air dry clay in the shape.
    6.then let the clay dry overnight and the next day your done.

    Reply

    •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

      Hmm… This is a slightly different way of doing it. It might work out though! I think for the results that your teacher wants you may want to check with a classmate and see if you need something for the plaster of Paris.

      I am curious to see how it would turn out without the missing ingredient though. In real life, the presence and absence of certain materials can affect how the fossil looks and we can interpret in what sort of environment it was preserved in.

      Reply

  7.   Sinju & Nicola Says:

    You will need
    .Tin-Foil
    .A shell,a piastic animal and a little bone
    .Bowl x2
    .plaster of paris
    .Water
    .Air dry clay

    Method
    1.First,get your Tin-Foil and wrap it around the bowl.
    2.Next,get your plaster of pairs and mix with water and
    when you have a smooth consistency.
    3.Put,the plaster of pairs in the Tin-Foil bowl.
    4.Then,put your shell,plastic animal and the little bone in the plaster of pairs and let it dry overnight.
    5.When its dry Remove the shell, plastic animal or bone.
    6.Get Air dry clay and put it in the shape of the mould and let it dry for 3 days.
    7.Get the Air dry clay out of the plaster of pairs and you have your fossil.

    Reply

    •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

      Great job! Consistency is very important for mixing plaster. My professor at my undergrad uni told me it should feel like melted ice cream. Does plaster have other uses in paleontology?

      Reply

  8.   Zofia & Mrs Hester Says:

    Equipment:

    plaster of Paris

    water

    bowl
    foil
    clay
    spoon
    measuring jug
    small shell, bone, or small plastic animal

    Method:

    First, line a small bowl with foil making sure there are no holes.

    Then, carefully mix the plaster according to the instructions.

    After that, pour the mixture into the bowl.

    Gently press your chosen object into the plaster making sure you don’t push it in too far.

    Leave to set overnight.

    Remove the object from the mould.

    Then, push softened clay into the mould and leave to harden for at least 3 days.

    ALWAYS ask an adult for help and take care when using Plaster of Paris.

    Reply

    •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

      Well done. Checking for equipment failures is a good safety step. Can you think of another way to replicate an object? (Hint: Think high-tech.)

      Reply

      •   Zofia and Mrs Hester Says:

        We thought that it would be interesting to have a go at reproducing a fossil on a 3D printer, but sadly our school haven’t got one.
        We are only aged 8 and 9 and we have only just started to learn about fossils but we are all enjoying our new topic of Scavengers and Settlers. We are learning about the Stone Age at the moment.

        Reply

        •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

          Perfect! 3D printer was the answer I was looking for. I don’t think most schools have one. They are still expensive and have only been used extensively in paleontology for the past 5 years or so.

          Very good. Enjoy your studies!

          Reply

  9.   AmirahPrachi&Sufian Says:

    You will need plaster of paris,bowl,seashale,water,air-dry clay,tin foil,spoon 1. First you have to put the tin foil on your bowl
    2.Next put plaster of paris in the bowl then add water and mix it,you should have a runny consistency pour it in your bowl.
    3.Then put your object in your bowl and push it in gently and leave it to dry.4.after that carefully pull it out then get your air-dry and warm it up with your hands .4.after push and mould then shape it then let it dry. 5.After that take the mould uot and your done.

    Reply

  10.   poppy & Charis Says:

    how to make a fossil
    You will need:
    water
    two bowls
    spoon
    plaster of Paris
    object(shell, bone or a plastic animal)
    air-dry clay
    tin foil
    Jug
    method
    1.First get a bowl and rap it in tin foil.
    2.Next mix the plaster of Paris with water.
    3.Pour your mixture into your tin foiled bowl.
    4.Push your object into the plaster of Paris.
    5.Now leave it over night.
    6.When it has dried, then carefully remove the object.
    7. Then get air- dry clay & gently push it in.
    8. let this dry for 3 days and then it should fall out of the mould easily.
    now you have your own fossil!

    Reply

    •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

      Great job calling it a mold! What can a mold show us that a compression or impression fossil cannot?

      Reply

  11.   David & Michael Says:

    You will need…
    . Plaster of Paris
    . Shell or toy
    . Tin foil
    . Bowl
    Method
    First you rap the tin foil around the bowl.Then put the Plaster of Paris and pour water into the plaster of Paris quickly the object in.After a while take the object out of the plaster of Paris.Next you use clay and carefully put it in the plaster of Paris around the patterns and leave it for three days and take it out of the plaster of Paris.

    Reply

    •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

      Excellent! Should I be concerned with putting an object in the plaster too soon or too late?

      Reply

      •   Michael Says:

        If you put the object too late the plaster of Paris would have been dried so you will have to start all over again. In the other hand the earlier you put the object in the plaster the better.P

        Reply

  12.   Eric & pawel Says:

    ] You will need
    1.bowl
    2.tin foil
    3.plaster of Paris
    4.object
    5.clay
    Method first we get a bowl next we put the tin foil in the bowl after we put the plaster of Paris then we put the object in it after that we took it out then we had some clay and we squished it then we put it in our bowl then we left it to dry for 3 days the end

    Reply

    •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

      Nice! Do I need to mix anything with the plaster of Paris? Maybe check with another classmate?

      I am curious though to see what would happen if you didn’t mix anything. There are scientists who run experiments like this. They are called taphonomists. Fossils can preserve in different ways and by understanding multiple processes of preservation and how deformities in a fossil arise we can understand the conditions in which something became a fossil.

      Reply

  13.   Pasang&abubakar Says:

    You will need
    :tin fiol
    :plaster of paris
    :boll
    :air dry clay
    :objects
    1.You need a boll and tin fiol so that the boll can be
    coverd.
    2.when you finished covering the boll then put the tin foil then put your bone gently then leave it for one hour.
    3.Then take your object out then take your air-dry clay
    then roll your clay and squish it until it gets warm then put your air-dry clay in the bowl gently then leave it for 3 days when 3 days is finished take your air-dry clay and there you go your own fossil.

    Reply

    •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

      Hmm… We might want to look at those steps again. Here is a hint: If we put the clay in an empty bowl, what are we going to get a “fossil” of?

      Your set-up actually reflects what happens to most organisms in real life. Why is that and what does that say about fossilization?

      Reply

  14.   NANCY& Farah Says:

    HOW TO MAKE A FOSSli
    first do this get a bowl.
    then get some water poor plaster pair then mix it
    after you mix it poor it the bowl then do this put the
    the shelver in plaster pairs.
    then we wet for plaster pairs to dry
    then put the cla in fossil hop full it HOFALLU IT WELL GET OUT.

    Reply

    •   MacKenzie Smith Says:

      I hope it will come out too! When we create field jackets and repository jackets out of plaster of Paris for fossil bones we have have to add a protective layer between the fossil and the jacket so the plaster doesn’t stick to the fossil and end up hurting it. What sort of materials might we use to make our protective layer?

      Reply

  15.   Jacob&Borys Says:

    You need. Shell, Bole, Plaster of Paris, Tin Foil,Method.First you need a bole

    Reply

  16.   Jacob&Borys Says:

    You need. Shell, Bole, Air dry clay, Tin foil, Plaster of Paris, Method.

    Reply

  17.   Dr Susie Maidment Says:

    Well, you can only really ‘make’ a fossil by replicating geological forces – heat and pressure over long periods of time. but the methods you are suggesting are good to produce a mould and cast of the shell, and that happens in the rock record too!

    University of Brighton

    Reply

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